Theresa May will be no friend to the poor and vulnerable, voting record shows

Theresa May's voting record will undoubtedly leave many people worried about what the future may hold.

Theresa May at the US Embassy London, 2012. Photo: Flickr - http://flic.kr/p/bD16ca

Theresa May is about to replace David Cameron as leader of the Conservative Party and our new Prime Minister, after Brexiter Andrea Leadsom dropped out of the leadership contest on Monday.

But what will Theresa’s May succession mean for the poor, disabled and other vulnerable sections of society? We’ve take a close look at her voting record and apart from a few positives the results will leave many people worried about the future.

How Theresa May voted on Welfare and Benefits

Generally voted for reducing housing benefit for social tenants deemed to have excess bedrooms (otherwise known as “bedroom tax”).



Consistently voted against raising welfare benefits at least in line with prices.

Generally voted against paying higher benefits over longer periods for those unable to work due to illness or disability.

Generally voted for making local councils responsible for helping those in financial need afford their council tax and reducing the amount spent on such support.

Generally voted for a reduction in spending on welfare benefits.

Generally voted against spending public money to create guaranteed jobs for young people who have spent a long time unemployed.

How Theresa May voted on Social Issues

Voted a mixture of for and against equal gay rights.

Generally voted against smoking bans.



Almost always voted against the hunting ban.

Consistently voted for allowing marriage between two people of same sex.

Generally voted against laws to promote equality and human rights.

Generally voted against allowing terminally ill people to be given assistance to end their life.

How Theresa May voted on Taxation and Employment

Generally voted for raising the threshold at which people start to pay income tax.

Generally voted for increasing the rate of VAT.

Generally voted for higher taxes on alcoholic drinks.



Generally voted for higher taxes on plane tickets.

Generally voted for lower taxes on fuel for motor vehicles.

Generally voted against increasing the tax rate applied to income over £150,000.

Voted a mixture of for and against encouraging occupational pensions.

Generally voted against automatic enrolment in occupational pensions.

Generally voted against a banker’s bonus tax.

Voted a mixture of for and against higher taxes on banks.



Almost always voted against an annual tax on the value of expensive homes (popularly known as a mansion tax).

Generally voted for allowing employees to exchange some employment rights for shares in the company they work for.

Generally voted for more restrictive regulation of trade union activity.

How Theresa May voted on Health

Generally voted against restricting the provision of services to private patients by the NHS.

Generally voted for reforming the NHS so GPs buy services on behalf of their patients.

Generally voted against introducing foundation hospitals.



Generally voted against smoking bans.

Generally voted against allowing terminally ill people to be given assistance to end their life.

How Theresa May voted on Education

Almost always voted for greater autonomy for schools.

Consistently voted for raising England’s undergraduate tuition fee cap to £9,000 per year.

Almost always voted for academy schools.

Has never voted on ending financial support for some 16-19 year olds in training and further education.

Generally voted against university tuition fees.


Source: Information provided by TheyWorkForYou. You can view further details about Theresa May’s voting record here.