Home More News Royal College Of GPs Warns Of High Stress Levels For Doctors

Royal College Of GPs Warns Of High Stress Levels For Doctors

Must Read

Number of Brits suffering from malnutrition has soared under the Tories

Labour described the shocking increase in malnutrition cases as "unforgivable" and said government ministers "should be ashamed".

Benefit claimant with broken back killed himself after being found ‘fit for work’ by DWP

He was left pennniless and unable to pay the rent or top up his electricity meter.

Universal Credit staff poised for further walk-outs

PCS union warns that strike action could spread to more Universal Credit Services Centres.

UK pensioners ‘suffering the worst poverty rate in western Europe’

Tories warned against further rises to the state pension age.

Guest Post By Adam Colclough


GP services across the country are buckling under the weight of work placed on doctors, causing serious concern for patient safety warns the Royal College of GPs (RCGP).

The number of consultations has risen to 360 million a year since 2010 and there are fewer GPs now than there were in 2009, the RCGPs says another 3300 are needed just to keep pace with current demand.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has promised that 5000 extra GPs are going to be trained along with 5000 support workers, but this is linked to doctors accepting seven-day working. There will also be cash incentives for doctors who choose to work in deprived areas.

The RCGPs has also warned that the exhaustion and stress experienced by doctors could lead to mistakes and may put lives at risk.

For most people their GP is their first point of contact with the NHS, in this age of austerity they have been obliged to take on ever more responsibilities as other services shrink or disappear entirely.

As a result GP surgeries are creaking under the strain and if the concerns expressed by the RCGPs are correct may soon become seriously compromised.

This will have particularly serious consequences in areas facing serious problems with deprivation since a visit to the doctor can often identify the need for support from other services such as food banks and housing support and provide a means of signposting for people in need of help.

The pressures on the service mean these problems may be missed by doctors with too many patients and too little time in which to see them with serious, maybe deadly consequences.

Jeremy Hunt’s promise of an extra 5000 GPs and a matching number of support staff represents fine words, but little promise of action offered as a bribe for the existing stretched service embracing seven-day working with five-day resources.

The rising cost of higher education and the length of medical training means fewer and fewer students will come forward to train as doctors. In the short-term the gap may be plugged by bringing in medical staff from overseas, but this is not an economically or ethically sustainable option.

The government is trying its hardest to sell the public the concept that seven-day working will solve all the problems of the NHS. It may solve some, those related to improving access for example, but if the service isn’t funded properly and there are too few trained staff it will do more harm than good.


SUPPORT US!

If you would like to see more stories like this please consider a one off donation. Thank you for your support!

1 COMMENT

  1. Fine words but it takes between 5 and 7 years to train a GP so who thinks they have a magic wand. As far as hospital senior staff are concerned I have been an inpatient and been seen by consultant at weekends

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

FOLLOW US

16,637FansLike
9,363FollowersFollow

Latest News

Universal Credit staff poised for further walk-outs

PCS union warns that strike action could spread to more Universal Credit Services Centres.

Number of Brits suffering from malnutrition has soared under the Tories

Labour described the shocking increase in malnutrition cases as "unforgivable" and said government ministers "should be ashamed".

Jeremy Corbyn: Tories failing homeless children and poverty-stricken families

Labour leader vows to end the benefit freeze and halt the rollout of Universal Credit.

Half of private landlords say tenants on Universal Credit have rent arrears

54% of private landlords have tenants on Universal Credit who have fallen behind on rent payments.

130,000 families forced to live in one bed flats due to chronic social housing shortage

Calls for a £12.8bn national investment in social housing building.

More Articles Like This