Sunday, January 19, 2020

Rethink Apologises For Offensive ‘Disease Burden’ Email – But Then Defend It

Must Read

5,000 sick and disabled people died awaiting benefit repayments after ‘scandalous’ DWP error

"That 5,000 disabled people were denied the proper support to live independently before they died is scandalous."

Free period products to be made available in all schools and colleges in England

New government scheme is designed to combat stigma and tackle 'period poverty'.

Woman who can collapse at any moment due to a rare heart condition is denied benefits

Gail Ward was told that she did not qualify for PIP payments, despite living with a potentially life-threatening heart condition.

Stroke care facing a ‘ticking time-bomb’, says charity

Charity warns that the number of stroke professionals in the UK is at a worryingly low level.

Citizens Advice demands ‘fundamental overhaul’ of Universal Credit system

"We need to see significant changes to the way the Universal Credit is designed and delivered to ensure it supports the people who need it."
16,695FansLike
9,413FollowersFollow

The charity Rethink has issued an apology in response to concerns about an email which appeared to suggest that people with mental health problems are a”disease burden” on the NHS.

Mark Winstanley, CEO of Rethink Mental Illness said: “We sincerely apologise if any offence was caused by our use of the phrase ‘disease burden’ in our recent email to our supporters.

“Health organisations campaigning on a wide range of issues have been using this term for many years. It is widely accepted by health professionals and policy makers as the correct term for quantifying the national impact of a health problem as measured by financial cost, mortality or morbidity.

“It is in this spirit which we use the phrase to highlight this nationally important issue. It is in no way intended to imply that individuals affected by mental illness, or other diseases or disabilities are a burden.”

Asked why so many people with mental health issues were offended by the term “disease burden”, co-founder of the Mental Health Resistance Network Denise McKenna said:

“It is highly complex but I think there are three main arguments. The first point is that this mail out was sent to people who were not familiar with this term as a technical term, it was sent to everyday people, including a lot of disabled people. Rethink should be capable of thinking ahead and asking how this term would be understood by the random people they were sending the mailing to.

“Secondly, I think there is an acceptance that technical language can never direct, even at an unconscious level, how people, including the technicians who use it, perceive an issue. But this is questionable. In the same vein, technical language can reflect how something is viewed at an emotional or political level but be embedded within technical terms that cannot be challenged, just as you are questioning whether a technical term should be challenged.

“The concerns around technical language being “loaded” would require a whole book to be written to tease out all of the issues. It may seem radical to even question the use of language that is deemed to be technical or academic but there are good arguments for doing so, however these are too complex to go into here.

“There is a final point that relates to the medical model of mental distress which questions whether what is called “mental illness” is even “illness” (or “disease”) at all. For several decades there has been a question mark over whether mental distress is an illness or a human response to unbearable circumstances. This is why many survivors prefer the term “mental distress”.

“This non medical model of mental distress, a social model, has been argued for many years by survivors yet Rethink, along with the other mental health charities, still refuse to even consider it. Hence we have legions of people who are not helped by drugs yet who live with dreadful side effects from them.

“However, the pharmaceutical companies are too powerful for us ever to be able to move away from the medical model of mental distress. Having said all of this, I think for the purposes of this complaint, the first objection is more than enough.”

Responding to the apology in a letter to Rethink (co-signed by Disabled People Against Cuts), Denise McKenna said: “Rethink seem to think they’ve offered an apology – I don’t agree, plus this is not on their home page, but needs to be searched for”.

“Winstanley has also clearly missed the point because he refers to “mental illness or other diseases” so reaffirming his belief that mental distress is a disease.”

“I’m thinking there must be a long list of former technical terms that have been abandoned exactly because they were offensive, I’m not an expert in this but in my youth words like mad, handicapped, mongol, manic depressive, and more were in common use as the correct labels for people, so I don’t think calling it an accepted technical term can be considered a defence.”

MHRN and DPAC say they have included comments from people who were offended by the words “disease burden” in their response to Rethink.

 

Related: Fury As Charity Claims People With Mental Health Problems Are A ‘Disease Burden’

[sdonations]1[/sdonations]

 

Latest News

Woman who can collapse at any moment due to a rare heart condition is denied benefits

Gail Ward was told that she did not qualify for PIP payments, despite living with a potentially life-threatening heart condition.

Free period products to be made available in all schools and colleges in England

New government scheme is designed to combat stigma and tackle 'period poverty'.

Stroke care facing a ‘ticking time-bomb’, says charity

Charity warns that the number of stroke professionals in the UK is at a worryingly low level.

5,000 sick and disabled people died awaiting benefit repayments after ‘scandalous’ DWP error

"That 5,000 disabled people were denied the proper support to live independently before they died is scandalous."

Charity exposes ‘glaring employment gap’ for people with epilepsy

Employment rate for people with epilepsy is far lower than for those with most other disabilities.

Newsletter

Get weekly news updates delivered straight to your inbox. Subscribe today!