Photo credit: madamepsychosis via photopin cc

Mental health campaigners have criticised new Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) guidance, which could make it more difficult for women to claim sickness benefits than men.

New guidance issued by the DWP to healthcare professionals assessing people for Employment and Support Allowance (ESA), suggests that men and women should be tested differently.

A man who has been diagnosed with mental health problems and in danger of self-harm or suicide may be assessed as having limited capability for work. Whereas a women in the same position could be asked to show additional ‘personal factors’, such as a family history of suicide, in order to receive ESA.

The Government says the advice has been issued because suicide is “more prevalent among men than women”.

However, campaigners say the new guidance is over-simplistic and added that the Work Capability Assessment (WCA) has already been heavily criticised over fairness and accuracy.

Carolyn Roberts from the Scottish Association for Mental Health (SAMH) warned that the changes were “potentially harmful” and urged the DWP to withdraw the advice.

“The Work Capability Assessment has already been heavily criticised for not being able to accurately assess mental health problems, with independent reviews recommending its assessors should have more experience in mental health”, she said.

“And while it is undoubtedly true that more men lose their lives to suicide than women, this looks like the addition of a blunt and unsophisticated method of assessment to a system that is already failing people with mental health problems. SAMH calls on the DWP to withdraw these new rules.”

Tom Pollard, policy and campaigns manager at mental health charity Mind, said the charity is “seeking further clarification from the DWP on the reasoning behind this decision, which massively oversimplifies the issues around suicidal thoughts, feelings and actions”.

He added: “Although men account for around three-quarters of all suicides, this doesn’t tell the whole story as attempted suicides are not taken into account.

“There is still a huge lack of understanding within the welfare system around mental health and we want to see greater expertise on mental health and the impact it can have on somebody’s ability to work.”

The DWP said the guidance is included in a handbook given to health professionals who assess sick and disabled people for ESA and should not be regarded as “hard and fast rules”.

They added: “In the subject areas covered by the guidance there are some differences between men and women – for example, men have higher suicide rates than women – and the way the guidance is written is designed to take that into account.”


If you have been affected by the issues raised in this article please contact the Samaritans on 08457 90 90 90 or visit their website for support.


 

3 COMMENTS

  1. It’s just as bad for men don’t split the problem up by claiming women have it harder than men that plays into the hands of the fascists running the dwp.

  2. Anyone sitting in on a work capability assessment will notice one thing and one thing only it takes no account of the persons medical condition at all. The One size fits all test is not capable of assessing so many different medical conditions. and you do not have to have any medical qualifications to know its a fake medical designed clearly to reduce benefits.
    When decisions are over turned on countless appeals you know the test was fake.

Leave a comment...

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.